Aeronautical Terms beginning with B

Back Side Of The Power Curve

Flight regime in which flight at a higher airspeed requires a lower power setting and a lower airspeed requires a higher power setting in order to maintain altitude.


Balked Landing

A go-around.


Ballast

Removable or permanently installed weight in an aircraft used to bring the center of gravity into the allowable range.


Balloon

The result of a too aggressive flare during landing causing the aircraft to climb.


Basic Empty Weight (GAMA)

Basic empty weight includes the standard empty weight plus optional and special equipment that has been installed.


Best Angle Of Climb (Vx)

The speed at which the aircraft will produce the most gain in altitude in a given distance.


Best Glide

The airspeed in which the aircraft glides the furthest for the least altitude lost when in non-powered flight.


Best Rate Of Climb (Vy)

The speed at which the aircraft will produce the most gain in altitude in the least amount of time.


Blade Face

The flat portion of a propeller blade, resembling the bottom portion of an airfoil.


Bleed Air

Compressed air tapped from the compressor stages of a turbine engine by use of ducts and tubing. Bleed air can be used for deice, anti-ice, cabin pressurization, heating, and cooling systems.


Bleed Valve

In a turbine engine, a flapper valve, a popoff valve, or a bleed band designed to bleed off a portion of the compressor air to the atmosphere. Used to maintain blade angle of attack and provide stall-free engine acceleration and deceleration.


Boost Pump

An electrically driven fuel pump, usually of the centrifugal type, located in one of the fuel tanks. It is used to provide fuel to the engine for starting and providing fuel pressure in the event of failure of the engine driven pump. It also pressurizes the fuel lines to prevent vapor lock.


Buffeting

The beating of an aerodynamic structure or surface by unsteady flow, gusts, etc.; the irregular shaking or oscillation of a vehicle component owing to turbulent air or separated flow.


Bus Bar

An electrical power distribution point to which several circuits may be connected. It is often a solid metal strip having a number of terminals installed on it.


Bus Tie

A switch that connects two or more bus bars. It is usually used when one generator fails and power is lost to its bus. By closing the switch, the operating generator powers both busses.


Bypass Air

The part of a turbofan’s induction air that bypasses the engine core.


Bypass Ratio

The ratio of the mass airflow in pounds per second through the fan section of a turbofan engine to the mass airflow that passes through the gas generator portion of the engine. Or, the ratio between fan mass airflow (lb/sec.) and core engine mass airflow (lb/sec.).


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